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20121211
20121211
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
in washington. while the fed is making a tidy out.it on a controversial about to send that and more out the door. to pump up the economy. >> the financial crisis has a tidy profit for taxpayers. they sold the last remaining shares of insurance giant a.zig today. the company nearly collapsed in 2008 after making risky financial bet. the treasury and the federal reserve came to the rescue, taking it over and backing it with $182 billion. avenue self-ing off the last shares treasury reported $5 billion profit on the bail-out. the federal reserve made $17.7 billion. but the fed won't be parking its cash. it's holding a two-day policy meeting and it is expected to announce tomorrow it will continue to keep interest rates low. but it wants to get them especially lower. for mortgages, car loan and business loan. it is expected to expand one of the major stimulus programs known as quantitative easing. it will buy more treasury bonds from banks and investors for cash. extra $40 billion or so a month. the fed hopes it will create more jobs. >> even though unemployment ticked down there is a reserve of peo
. up until then more from this morning's "washington journal" focus on domestic program cuts. >> host: domestic spending cuts is on the table for the fiscal cliff talks. two different perspectives for you here. isabel sawhill, brookings institution. brookings center on children and families. james capretta ethics and public policy center and visiting scholar at aei. let me begin with you. are these potential domestic cuts under sequestration devastating or manageable? >> guest: somewhere in between. not a good idea. they would be very deep cuts, you know, an 8% cut across the board is a very significant one-time cut for any program to sustain in immediate year period. so they're not a good idea. would it be the end of the world, no? >> host: what do you mean by that? >> guest: well, i mean there would be downsizing of a lot of services across the government in terms of the domestic accounts. so it would be fewer services being provided. there would be reduced federal employees. some grant programs would take a haircut of five, 10%. so there would be downsizing of the services provided
labor unions. >>> here in washington, republicans turn the tables on president obama. we're going to tell you what specific information they are now demanding. >>> and who was she? you're going to find out why a century's old mystery may be closer to a solution. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." we begin with today's dramatic defeat for union workers in the industrial's heartland. this was the scene as republicans pushed through right to work bills saying that they don't have to pay union dues in in order to get a job. on lookers chanted, shame on you after the vote. this is a watershed moment because michigan is the same as countless union struggles, including this 1932 march where five people died and dozens were injured when unemployed workers were attacked by police and ford motor company security guards. after decades of gains, fewer than 12% of u.s. workers now belong to unions. in michigan, it's fewer than 18%. cnn's poppy harlow is at the state capital in lansing. how did it go? >> reporter: are an historic day in michigan. a state at the heart of organized
last night at the christmas in washington event. december 21st, diana ross. that's it for us. thanks for watching. "erin burnett out front" starts right now. >> out front next, president obama in michigan today, selling americans on his plan for taxes. we're 22 days away from the cliff. does the plan add up? >> and a daring rescue in afghanistan claimed the life of an american navy s.e.a.l. as we prepare to go to afghanistan, we take a closer look at the american troop presence and how many americans will stay. >>> and offfield violence leads to the death of two nfl players. why the violence on the field, though, is a much more important issue. let's go "out front." >> good evening, everyone. i'm erin burnett. "outfront" tonight, cliff, slope, grand canyon. i don't know, martian cave, jupiter like storm. is the fiscal cliff really a fiscal slope. a downward spiral to something much worse. the possibility of going off the cliff is just 22 days away, and it sounds pretty ominous, but it could be a walk in the part compared with what could happen if lawmakers don't take a closer look at
absolutely right. what happens if we settle on what washington thinks is a big win? let's call it $3 trillion. >> i think $3 trillion, $4 trillion will be a sufficient number, erin, to sort of calm investment markets and to produce a real economy that is growth positive as opposed to growth negative. you know, the real problem going forward is, you know, we are going over the cliff no matter what and depends on whether we go over like will e. coyote or road run we are a parachute. that's the road runner with a ra pa ra chute and there's more taxes to raise and entitlements to cut over the ensuing years. >> that's i guess the problem. i prefer to be roadrunner with a ra pa parachute. how can washington do the deal that prevent it is country from -- to give a sense of the outcomes, could be borrowing costs skyrocket. the costs are very serious in the long term. right? >> i think they are. it involves what's known as fiscal drag to economists. basically when you raise taxes and lower entitlements, lower federal spending, that reduces economic growth and it will. it just depend on how slowly or h
to work. cisco. tomorrow starts here. >>> while the standoff continues in washington on how to avoid that fiscal cliff, there's another really big conversation that's brewing about how each and every one of your hard-earned tax dollars is actually spent. we got a reality check for you that you may not like to hear. for every one dollar that the government collects, it spends 71 cents of it on the big four. the big four are medicare, medicaid, social security, and interest. just interest on the nation's dea debt. so that ain't pretty and i'm sorry to say it's not getting any prettier. in the next four years, those costs will eat up 100% of every dollar that the government collects. these are sad statistics from the government accountability office. no money for defense, nothing for education, food, safety, veterans, the whole shebang. it's basically in your own personal economy like spending every cent you earn on your mortgage and nothing else. no food,clothes, no car, you get the picture, right. the 20-year prediction is even more mind blowing. the big four is set to consume $1.21 f
thinkin a budget.d... well, we worked hard for those benefits. we earned them. and if washington tries to cram decisions about the future... of these programs into a last minute budget deal... we'll all pay the price. aarp is fighting to protect seniors with responsible... solutions that strengthen medicare and... social security for generations to come. we can do better than a last minute deal... that would hurt all of us. how they'll live tomorrow. for more than 116 years, ameriprise financial has worked for their clients' futures. helping millions of americans retire on their terms. when they want. where they want. doing what they want. ameriprise. the strength of a leader in retirement planning. the heart of 10,000 advisors working with you one-to-one. together for your future. ♪ >>> huge protests taking place at michigan state house. there's a vote from the house that has passed the right to work bill. want to bring in alison kosik for the latest. this is controversial, allison. how are people responding? >> reporter: there's not much response here. what's going on inside the ca
william burns is scheduled to meet tuesday in washington. >>> a search for active earthquake faults near japan's nuclear power plant may lead to the scrapping of one of them. implications run deep. >> reporter: 17 commercial nuclear plants and one major test reactor have been built in japan. the nuclear regulation authority was formed after last year's disaster to monitor their safety. experts at the authority are trying to determine if any of the reactors lie above active fault lines. the tsuruga plant in central japan has been known to have an active fault running close by. the fault is called urasoko. another fault intersects with it. it runs right under the facility's number two reactor. a team of experts dug up the ground at the plant so they could inspect the fault directly. the government panel examined the results of the so-called trade survey. panel members said on monday that the d-1 fault is probably active. they said that layers of earth near the fault have become deformed. the deformation is believed to cause d-1 to become active when national guidelines ban the building of
the fiscal deadline could affect the defense budget. >> on tomorrow morning's "washington journal," we continue our look at the so- called fiscal clef and what happens if the budget cuts take place in january. jim doyle the effect on businesses. after that, charles clark looks at domestic program cuts. in more about the issue with the brookings institution. bless your e-mail, phone calls, and tweets. that is live tuesday at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> next, president obama talking about the economy and the need to reach an agreement with congress on the january fiscal deadline. he spoke at a diesel plant outside of detroit. his remarks are about 25 minutes. >> hello, redford! [applause] it is good to be back in michigan. [applause] how is everybody doing today? [applause] now, let me just start off by saying we have something in common -- both our teams lost yesterday. [laughter] i mean, i would like to come here and talk a little smack about the bears, but we didn't quite get it done. but it is wonderful to be back. it is good to see everybody in the great state of michigan. [appl
's an example of how just murky the divisions are in syria, later today washington will declare one of the group of rebels a foreign terrorist organization. according to federal documents the group is merely another alias or al qaeda in iraq. >>> this morning we know the name of the navy s.e.a.l. killed during a raid to rescue a kidnapped american doctor in afghanistan. the s.e.a.l. is identified as petty officer first class nicolas checque. barbara starr joins us from the pentagon with more on petty officer checque, a member of s.e.a.l. team six, the same elite unit that of course took out osama bin laden. barbara? >> good morning, ted. the military is confirming now that the body of 28-year-old nicolas checque has been returned to the united states, back to his family. no announcement about burial services for this young man, a native of pennsylvania, navy s.e.a.l. who is remembered by those who knew him at his high school, his principal, his wrestling coach, talking about the young man they knew when he was a boy back in school. >> worked hard every day, never complained. those are the things
program of this kind. passenger rail and our states of oregon and washington has been in place since 1994 where we have partnered from the state level with amtrak, and in our state, burlington northern santa fe, in a collaborative approach to an incremental delivery of high and higher speed rail programs and service. so as we've been investing over the years, we see the implementation in the creation of a national vision as a very important part of what we are trying to deliver. we have a 460-mile corridor between eugene, oregon, and vancouver, british columbia. we have achieved in the last year up to 850 passengers, 50,000 passengers, and our growth is increasing year over year in the 10% rate. we have in our state invested over $480 million in capital and operations in amtrak cascades, which is what we call our program. but it wasn't until the recovery act came that we're able to make significant capital infrastructure improvements on the rail itself. sightings, double tracking, positive train control, all those amenities that will benefit high and higher speed rail, and more frequent s
plus, your e-mails, phone calls and tweets. washington journal, live tuesday, at 7:00 a.m. eastern, on c-span. >> now, latinos and the 2012 election, and what policy issues influenced their vote. speakers included former white house adviser to latin american, soto, and alfonso aguilar.: this is about two hours. [inaudible conversations] s. >> this is i think, as you all know, a place where public policy and research meet. i bring together the world of ideas with the world of policy action. very happy that tim johnson, the director of the latin american program is here this morning. and also want to acknowledge sal low star who had a lot to do with the planning, and this is an event we're cosponsoring with immigration works, to tamar a jacoby, and arizona state university, working on the issues. i want to acknowledge cardenas, a former governor and distinguished mexican colleague and many other good friends. and mane others back at the woodrow wilson system. and dan, who is out of government and into this civilian life. there's no doubt the latino vote was important in this past ele
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

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